In a busy, major city, there are always people coming and going for both business and personal purposes. Working in a hotel can be a unique way to see and interact with many people from different professions, parts of the country, and walks of life. If you’re interested in a great career in the hospitality sector and are organized, dedicated and a good manager of projects and people, you could have an incredibly successful career as a manager of a large hotel. Because of many industries that could require their workers to travel being located in Houston, including the oil and health care industries, hotels are often busy and in need of good managers to keep up with the demand.

Hotel managers work in many arenas to make the inner workings of a hotel run smoothly. This includes managing the budgets and overall financial operations and hiring, firing and promoting employees. Additionally, they are the first face of the hotel for customer service and public opinion of the hotel.

The average annual salary for a hotel manager in Houston is $100,880 per year, according to Salary.com. This is approximately twice as much as the average annual household income in America, which means that it is almost four times as much as what the average American could expect to make in a year. It is not an entry-level job, though, and much of the higher salary is due to the years of experience that often are required for a higher level managerial job.

Hotel managers often have at least a bachelor’s degree in business, management or hospitality. There are many who also have gone back to school at some point for a master’s degree or an MBA. The University of Houston has a nationally recognized program that is training great workers in the hospitality industry, for Houstonians who are interested in furthering their education in the hospitality industry.

Gillian Kruse is a freelance writer living in Houston. She graduated from Rice University with a great love for all performing and visual arts. She enjoys writing about arts and cultural events, especially little-known ones, to help Houstonians learn about what’s going on in their city. Her work can be found at Examiner.com.

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