By ANNA-MEGAN RALEY, CBS Houston

(credit: DMITRY KOSTYUKOV/AFP/Getty Images)

No magical line exists to separate what is social drinking and problem drinking. And the social acceptance of alcohol consumption can mask a person’s problem with drinking. The bottom line is this: If drinking causes you problems in your life, you have a drinking problem.

One statistic suggests that nearly 13.8 million Americans – while another statistic says 18 million Americans – have problems with drinking. And chances are that you do, you know somebody who does or you have felt the impact directly from a person with a drinking problem. Read more stats.

People have drinking problems if they engage in drinking that adversely affects their finances, health, relationships, work or education. Given that drinking is a standard inclusion for so many social gatherings and functions, it’s no surprise that some people will become susceptible to drinking problems.

Learn to recognize the warning signs.

The following represents common questions which could point to a drinking problem in an individual’s life:

1.   Do you ever cover up your drinking behavior or make excuses for your drinking?

2.   Have you or anyone else ever been hurt or injured due to your drinking?

3.   Do you experience financial problems as a direct result of your drinking?

4.   Do you ever blame friends, family members or relatives for your drinking-related problems?

5.   Do you feel that your common sense and/or your decision-making skills have become adversely affected because of your drinking?

6.   Do you have to drink a lot more than you used to in order to get high or feel relaxed?

7.   Has your drinking led to legal problems such as one or more DUI arrests?

8.   Are you ever unable to control how much or how often you drink?

9.   Do you ever pass out due to your drinking?

10.  Do you ever feel ashamed or guilty about your drinking?

11.   Do you significantly miscalculate how much you drink?

12.   Is it your belief that your friends and family members overstate your drinking problems?

13.   Has your drinking led to a serious relationship problem, a separation or to a divorce?

14.   Do you ever drink to cope with any emotional issues?

15.   Have you ever wrecked your vehicle due to your drinking?

The main thing to remember is that if drinking negatively affects ANY part of your life, you not only have a drinking problem. But you are a problem drinker.

Choosing to get an alcohol assessment by a health care provider or doctor is always a positive course of action.

Read more at www.alcoholism-information.com or call 1 (888) 565-2282 if you have any questions about alcoholism.

 

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Note from the writer:
The information above was collected from multiple trusted nonprofit organizations. The information is everywhere. If this small sample of data and questions to determine if you have a drinking problem wasn’t enough, please keep reading. Throw your question into a Google search and perhaps you’ll find an answer tailored for you.

The video mentioned something incredible:

As many as half of the 18 million American alcoholics are considered high-functioning, meaning they can spend years maintaining the facade of a normal life until something catastrophic happens.

It’s true what they say: The first step is admitting you have a problem. Hopefully, that admission comes before a disaster or the loss of a relationship. I don’t know what it feels like to have an addiction, but I’ve watched addictions consume some of my friends and loved ones. And I’ve felt the impacts – emotionally, physically and financially. But the most painful part of it is being forced to stand by, unable to really do anything proactive.

Your mind is a powerful weapon. If you are struggling with addiction, I hope you’ll choose to beat your alcoholism or other addiction and seek help. If you have a loved one suffering from the anguish of alcohol abuse or alcoholism or even drug addiction, I hope you’ll also seek help from a support group like Al-Anon. Best wishes to you and yours. –AMR

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