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If you are having trouble finding holiday cheer, there are remedies for the blues. Wall Street Journal's Elizabeth Bernstein joins "CBS This Morning" with advice from experts in psychology, grief and happiness.
Airfares seem to keep on climbing, but a 23-year-old computer whiz found a way to save you hundreds on airline tickets. With a few clicks of the mouse, Skiplagged helps you find what's called "hidden city" airfares. Michelle Miller sat down with founder Aktarer Zaman who is creating some turbulence with travel industry giants.
The controversial developer of Da Vinci apartment complex is counting his losses. The devastating fire was ruled arson, and police in Los Angeles are looking for whoever is behind it. Danielle Nottingham reports on the painstaking search for clues.
Businesses in the Windy City face a growing threat blowing through their doors. Robbers are using a technique called "crash and grab." Their target? Chicago's upscale Magnificent Mile shopping district. Dean Reynolds reports from Chicago.
After a nine year run, the late-night TV show aired its final episode with a final burst of "truthiness". The "real" Stephen Colbert is heading to CBS's "Late Show." Vladimir Duthiers reports.
Wall Street has had a wild ride this week, with the index seeing three days of big drops before surging Wednesday and Thursday. The Dow Jones industrial average jumped 421 points Thursday alone and is approaching 18,000. Investors are hoping for more gains after the big turnaround this week. Jill Schlesinger joins "CBS This Morning" to discuss the
A scathing new report claims that the U.S. Secret Service is starved for leadership. As Bill Plante reports, the review found a lot to criticize including the height of the White House fence.
Hollywood is sounding off on Sony's decision to pull "The Interview" from theaters. Film and television stars alike are slamming the studio's decision. Elaine Quijano reports.
Sources tell CBS News the sophisticated and damaging cyberattack against Sony Pictures originated in North Korea and flowed through a vast array of computer servers in other countries in an attempt to hide its origin. Major Garrett reports.
How suspected Sony Pictures hacker North Korea could have done it; crowded field squeezing "Big Three" automakers in U.S.; FreshDirect changing the face of the grocery industry
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