Play With The Kids By Building A Playground In Houston

May 2, 2012 3:00 AM

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(credit: Thinkstock)

(credit: Thinkstock)

In Houston, April showers certainly bring May flowers, but that only paves the way for the summer heat. Houston families with young children can take advantage of the upcoming warm weather by building a playground in the backyard. Not only is a playground great fun for kids, but constructing it can be a wonderful bonding experience for the family. The result will be great times and great memories for years to come.

1. See what the kids would like. Before planning a playground, parents can venture to a local park, such as Deussen Park in northeast Houston, and allow children to play on the playground equipment to find what they like. Children can slide, swing, climb on monkey bars and lots more. Parents can observe which equipment offers their children the most enjoyment and safety, while also identifying which playsets are unsuitable for their child’s age group.

2. Get permission within the neighborhood, if needed. Remember to attain permission from your neighborhood’s Homeowner’s Association and obtain any required specifications for the proposed playground before getting started on the building process.

3. Decide on building it from scratch or buying a kit. Now that you’re ready to get started building, decide whether you want to build from scratch or purchase a playground kit. There are many local businesses that offer playground equipment, whether wood, metal, or other material, that are modular and easy to assemble and customize. If you choose this option, assembly will be easier and less time-consuming. On the other hand, if you choose to build the playground, playground designs can be purchased with the option to purchase accessories such as slides. In order to build this way, you would need to purchase lumber, tools and other assembly supplies. Assembly will be more difficult and require more time, but can be certainly be a rewarding experience when getting the children involved.

4. Surface the ground for safety. Finish off the playground project by surfacing the playground area. Playground surfacing keeps children safe and comfortable while playing. A common choice in Houston is loose-fill material which is easier and economical. Loose-fill material can include wood chips or mulch, as well as rubber products. Customization can also include installing a shade or covering to protect children from Houston’s summer heat.

Below are a few local businesses that may be able to help you get started:

Sportscrapers
23244 Hwy 290
Cypress, TX  77429
(281) 213-3311
www.allaboutplaygrounds.com

Hours: Mon to Fri – 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Sat and Sun – Closed

Playground equipment and shading structures can be purchased in one place at Sportscrapers. Families can choose from an assortment of playground designs for their backyard. You have the option to visit the catalog online or the showroom for playground equipment options.

McCauley Lumber Company
626 Aldine Bender
Houston, TX 77060
(281) 448-1374
www.mccauleyslumber.com 

Hours: Mon to Fri – 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Sat – 7 a.m. to 2 p.m.

If you decide to build the playground from the ground up, you will need lumber. McCauley Lumber Company specializes in lumber and has been serving Houston since 1949. 

Champion Landscape Supplies
1723 Hwy 6 South
Houston TX 77077
(281) 558-9948
www.houstonmulchandcompost.com

Hours: Mon to Sat – 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.  

After the playground is constructed, you need to choose the type of surface around the playground for the children’s safety. Mulch is a common option for playgrounds, and Champion Landscape Supplies offers a Kiddie Mulch composed of pine tree pulp wood.

Related: Guide to Summer Safety
Related: The Importance of Family Bonding Time

For more great tricks, tips and advice about your home, visit CBSHouston/YourHome.

Amber E. Wilson is an educator, writer, and entrepreneur who lives in Houston, Texas. She has earned a Bachelor of Arts in English and a Masters of Business Administration degree. She is also the founder and Executive Director of a nonprofit home high school that helps teens earn their diploma. Her work can be found at Examiner.com.


 

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