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Texas Family Of American Doctor Infected With Ebola Under 21-Day Fever Watch

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A picture taken on July 24, 2014 shows staff of the Christian charity Samaritan's Purse putting on protective gear in the ELWA hospital in the Liberian capital Monrovia. (credit: ZOOM DOSSO/AFP/Getty Images)

A picture taken on July 24, 2014 shows staff of the Christian charity Samaritan’s Purse putting on protective gear in the ELWA hospital in the Liberian capital Monrovia. (credit: ZOOM DOSSO/AFP/Getty Images)

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FORT WORTH, Texas (CBS Houston/AP) — State health officials say the family of an American doctor infected with the Ebola virus is under a 21-day fever watch, but it’s believed they had no contact with anyone with the deadly disease.

A spokeswoman for the Texas Department of State Health Services said Monday the agency interviewed Amber Brantly and her two children, ages 3 and 5, in the past couple of days and determined they hadn’t been exposed to an infected person.

Carrie Williams said “there is no need for isolation at this point” for them.

Amber Brantly’s husband, Dr. Kent Brantly, is in a Liberian hospital receiving treatment.

Williams stressed that people aren’t contagious until they show symptoms, and the doctor’s family left Liberia days before he got sick.

Dr. Tom Geisbert, a professor of microbiology and immunology at the University of Texas Medical Branch, tells CBS News that this Ebola outbreak is different than any other historically.

“(This outbreak) is very difficult to contain because it keeps popping up in different places,” Geisbert explained to CBS News. “The other thing that concerns us is the number of health care workers that are being infected … doctors or nurses. This is just crazy with the number of medical personnel getting infected.”

(TM and © Copyright 2014 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 2014 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)

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