GameDay Central: BENGALS 22 - TEXANS 13 4th Qtr - Arian Foster Out -Listen Live

News

Duck Commander CEO: Phil Robertson Is ‘The Real Deal’

View Comments
File photo of Phil Robertson. (credit: Jason Kempin/Getty Images)

File photo of Phil Robertson. (credit: Jason Kempin/Getty Images)

Featured Items

Small-Wtt8 Offensive Stars J.J. Watt Is Better Than

Small-WttTerran Hilow W/ Triple Threat

77820352_8Hot Cheerleader - Funny Faces 2014

From Our CBS Music Sites

77820352_8Sleeping With More Than 20 Women Lowers Your Cancer Risk

77820352_812 Musicians Who Really, Really Love Sports

listicle41 Duck Commander CEO: Phil Robertson Is The Real Deal The Health Benefits Of Growing A Beard

77820352_8Fight Ensues Because Of A McGriddle [VIDEO]

Get Breaking News First

Receive News, Politics, and Entertainment Headlines Each Morning.
Sign Up

WEST MONROE, La. (CBS Houston/AP) — The CEO of Duck Commander made his first public comments following A&E’s decision to bring back “Duck Dynasty” star Phil Robertson.

Willie Robertson, Phil’s son and one of the stars of “Duck Dynasty,” said on Twitter Friday that he was proud of the fans supporting the Robertson family.

“Back to work!!! So proud of all the fans of the show and family,” Willie Robertson tweeted. “Ole Phil may be a little crude but his heart is good. He’s the Real Deal!”

A&E reversed course Friday, announcing they were bringing back Phil Robertson after suspending him indefinitely following his comments about homosexuality in a recent GQ interview. The family threatened in a statement that they could not do the show without the patriarch of the family.

The gay right group GLAAD, which had slammed Robertson’s comments, issued a critical statement despite A&E’s vague allusion to the support of “numerous advocacy groups” for its reversal.

“If dialogue with Phil is not part of (the) next steps, then A&E has chosen profits over African-American and gay people — especially its employees and viewers,” GLAAD said, referring to Robertson’s remark to GQ that he didn’t know any unhappy blacks in the pre-Civil Rights era South.

A&E said it intended to air a national public service campaign “promoting unity, tolerance and acceptance among all people.”

In the GQ interview, Robertson compared homosexuality to bestiality.

“Start with homosexual behavior and just morph out from there. Bestiality, sleeping around with this woman and that woman and that woman and those men,” Robertson told GQ. “Don’t be deceived. Neither the adulterers, the idolaters, the male prostitutes, the homosexual offenders, the greedy, the drunkards, the slanderers, the swindlers—they won’t inherit the kingdom of God. Don’t deceive yourself. It’s not right.”

Randy Schmidt, a “Duck Dynasty” viewer in Illinois, said he’s glad to see Robertson back on the show that Schmidt admires for its “Christian values.”

Although he didn’t care for Robertson’s comments he has a right to express his opinions, Schmidt said. He added that he’s likely not the only one pleased about Robertson’s return.

“A&E’s pocketbook will be happy, too,” Schmidt predicted.

Tony Perkins, president of the conservative Family Research Council in Washington, wasn’t among those calling for a boycott but said A&E could have suffered without its “about-face.”

“We’re seeing play out in front of us this great clash of cultures. Those in Hollywood don’t quite understand the values that for many of these people — and I put myself in that category — our values and faith are non-negotiable,” Perkins said.

Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, who had said that Miley Cyrus got a pass for twerking on TV while Phil got shown the door, lauded A&E for putting tolerance for religious views above “political correctness.”

Other shows have weathered their outspoken talent by simply bouncing them or not blocking their departure: Think Isaiah Washington on “Grey’s Anatomy,” fired in 2007 for referring to one of his show’s gay actors with a pejorative, or Alec Baldwin exiting his new MSNBC talk show after using gay slurs off the air.

But A&E found that easy road blocked for a reality show celebrity who was too real for some, just right for others.

Within a day of Robertson’s removal, more than 1 million people liked an impromptu Facebook page demanding A&E be boycotted until he returns. A petition calling for A&E to bring him back reached 250,000 signatures and counting in about a week.

The controversy similarly ensnared the Cracker Barrel restaurant chain, which removed “Duck Dynasty”-related merchandise from its shelves and then reversed course and apologized after being hit with complaints.

While TV ratings tend to fluctuate, particularly during the holidays when viewing drops, the overall A&E audience was smaller after it landed in “Duck” soup than before.

For the week of Dec. 16-22, the channel averaged 1.5 million viewers, compared to 2 million for the week before, according to Nielsen figures.

During the week of Dec. 17-23 last year, a roughly comparable period to the post-Robertson flap week, the channel averaged 1.73 million viewers.

“Duck Dynasty” is the channel’s highest-rated program and set a reality show record for cable with nearly 12 million viewers for its fourth-season debut this past summer.

Last week, the family said in a statement on its Duck Commander website that although some of Phil Robertson’s comments were coarse, “his beliefs are grounded” in the Bible and he “is a Godly man.” They also said that “as a family, we cannot imagine the show going forward without our patriarch at the helm.”

“Duck Dynasty” is on hiatus until Jan. 15, and the network has said that nine of next season’s 10 episodes have already been filmed. That means Robertson likely wasn’t needed in front of the camera before next March.

(TM and © Copyright 2013 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 2013 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)

View Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 25,283 other followers