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Wife Of Fort Hood Survivor Says ‘DOD Is Gagging Us’

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Attempted mass shooter Naser Jason Abdo remained defiant in court as a 'conscientious objector' as he was handed down two life sentences. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Attempted mass shooter Naser Jason Abdo remained defiant in court as a ‘conscientious objector’ as he was handed down two life sentences. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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FORT HOOD, Texas (CBS HOUSTON/AP) — The wife of a wounded Army staff sergeant from the 2009 Fort Hood shooting rampage is claiming the Department of Defense has “slapped victims of violence with gag order”.

Autumn Manning said via her personal Twitter account that the Defense Department is preventing them from discussing the denial of benefits and other developments in the wake of the attack.

Wounded have been denied combat benefits because the attack was classified as a “workplace violence” incident.

A military judge could decide Thursday whether the soldier accused in the 2009 shooting rampage at Fort Hood is trying to guarantee himself a death sentence.

Defense attorneys ordered to help Maj. Nidal Hasan as he represents himself during his murder trial said they believe he is trying to convince jurors to convict him. After only one day of testimony, the lawyers said, they couldn’t watch him fulfill a death wish.

“It becomes clear his goal is to remove impediments or obstacles to the death penalty and is working toward a death penalty,” his lead standby attorney, Lt. Col. Kris Poppe, told the judge on Wednesday. That strategy, he argued, “is repugnant to defense counsel and contrary to our professional obligations.”

Hasan gave a brief opening statement during the trial’s first day Tuesday that included claiming responsibility for the attack that killed 13 people at the Texas military post. He posed no questions to most witnesses and rarely spoke. On one of the few times he did talk, it was to get on the record that the alleged murder weapon was his — even though no one had asked.

Sometimes he took notes, but he mostly looked forward impassively.

Still, Hasan repeatedly objected Wednesday to Poppe’s assertions, telling the judge: “That’s a twist of the facts.”

Poppe told the judge he and the other standby lawyers want to take over the case. And if Hasan is allowed to continue on his own, they want their roles minimized so Hasan can’t ask them for help with a strategy they oppose.

The exchange prompted the judge, Col. Tara Osborn, to halt the long-delayed trial on only its second day. She must now decide what to do next, knowing that any decision will be scrutinized by a military justice system that has overturned most soldiers’ death sentences in the last three decades.

Hasan faces a possible death sentence if convicted of the 13 counts of premeditated murder and 32 counts of attempted premeditated.

“I don’t envy her. She’s on the horns of a dilemma here,” said Richard Rosen, a law professor at Texas Tech University and former military prosecutor who attended the first two days of trial. “I think whatever she does is potentially dangerous, at least from the view of an appellate court.”

Rosen and other experts said that if Osborn allows Poppe and Hasan’s other standby defense attorneys to take over, the judge could be seen as having unfairly denied Hasan’s right to defend himself, a right guaranteed by the Bill of Rights. But if she lets Hasan continue defending himself, she could be depriving him of adequate help from experienced attorneys.

He also noted that it’s extremely rare for defendants to represent themselves in military court.

“They don’t want this case to be reversed on appeal,” Rosen said. “The worst thing that can happen would be to retry the case all over again.”

Giving Poppe a more active role in the case or having him take over the defense could enable Hasan to argue he was denied his right to defend himself, added Victor Hansen, another former military prosecutor who teaches at the New England School of Law.

“At the end of the day, the defendant has the absolute right who’s going to represent him, including deciding to represent himself,” Hansen said.

Inside the courtroom on Wednesday, Osborn paused for nearly half a minute after Hasan objected to Poppe’s assertions about his defense strategy. The judge said she wanted Hasan to explain his objections in writing, but Hasan declined.

However, the judge did not immediately accept Poppe’s arguments. When Poppe noted that Hasan didn’t object to any jurors during jury selection, Osborn suggested that Hasan could simply be following a different strategy to ensure he’d have more jurors, knowing that only one juror has to vote against a death sentence for him to be spared.

“A lot of people would think that’s a brilliant strategy,” Osborn told Poppe.

There were likely objections Poppe may have raised, and the lawyer may have asked more questions, Rosen said. However, Hasan declining to cross-examine most witnesses — especially victims who survived the shooting — wasn’t necessarily a bad move, Rosen said.

“I’m not sure … what he could have done to impugn their testimony without ticking the jury off even more,” Rosen said.

The trial is scheduled to resume Thursday morning. Osborn did not say when she would decide on the motion.

(TM and © Copyright 2013 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 2013 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)

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