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Texas Prison System Running Out Of Execution Drug

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File photo of a Texas death chamber. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Newsmakers)

File photo of a Texas death chamber. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Newsmakers)

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HUNTSVILLE, Texas (AP)The nation’s most active death penalty state is running out of its execution drug.

The Texas Department of Criminal Justice said Thursday that its remaining supply of pentobarbital expires in September and that no alternatives have been found. It wasn’t immediately clear whether two executions scheduled for next month would be delayed. The state has already executed 11 death-row inmates this year, and at least seven more have execution dates in coming months.

“We will be unable to use our current supply of pentobarbital after it expires,” agency spokesman Jason Clark said. “We are exploring all options at this time.”

Texas switched to the lethal, single-dose sedative last year after one of the drugs used in its three-drug execution process became difficult to obtain and the state’s supply expired. Other death-penalty states have encountered similar problems after some drug suppliers barred the drugs’ use for executions or have refused, under pressure from death-penalty opponents, to sell or manufacture drugs for use in executions.

No executions in Texas were delayed because of that shortfall. But because the shortage is now affecting such an aggressive death-penalty state, the effects could move beyond Texas.

“When Texas raises a flag that’s it having a problem, obviously numerically it’s significant in the country,” Richard Dieter, executive director of the Washington-based Death Penalty Information Center, an anti-death penalty organization, said Thursday.

Some death penalty states, most recently Georgia, have announced they’re turning to compounding pharmacies, which make customized drugs that are not scrutinized by the Federal Drug Administration, to obtain a lethal drug for execution use.

Missouri wants to use propofol, the anesthetic blamed for pop star Michael Jackson’s 2009 death — even though the drug hasn’t been used to execute prisoners in the U.S. Its potential for lethal injection is under scrutiny by the courts.

“The states really scramble to go all over to get drugs. Some went overseas, some got from each other. But these manufacturers, a number them are based in Europe, don’t want to participate in our executions. So they’ve clamped down as much as they can,” Dieter said.

He said pentobarbital, which has been used along or in concert with other drugs in all executions in the U.S. the past two years, was more readily available because it was commonly used as a sedative.

“But I guess restrictions have been put on its distribution,” Dieter said. “It’s uncertain where all of this goes because it’s inherently a medical kind of procedure involving some health professionals who are largely focused on keeping people alive. It runs into contradictions with executions — people strapped to a table. Executions aren’t exactly what the medical model is.”

Texas has by far executed more inmates than any other state in the U.S. since the Supreme Court allowed executions to resume. Since 1982, six years after the high court’s order, Texas has executed 503 inmates. Virginia is a distant second at 110.

As of May 2012, Texas had 46 of the 2.5-gram vials of pentobarbital, presumably enough to execute as many as 23 prisoners since each execution requires a 5-gram dose. The execution Wednesday of an inmate convicted in two road-rage killings was the 20th lethal injection since that disclosure.

(© Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

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