News

Texas Proposal Would Make Local Police Enforcement Of Federal Gun Laws A Crime

View Comments
(Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

(Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

Featured Items

Small-WttNEW College Football Playoff System

Small-WttTinder Fun With Arian Foster Tweets

77820352_8Hot Cheerleader - Funny Faces 2014

From Our CBS Music Sites

77820352_8Awesomely Ugly Christmas Sweaters

77820352_8Houston Astros Tweet: Taylor Swift Concert Will Be Moved If They Make Postseason?!

459651046 Texas Proposal Would Make Local Police Enforcement Of Federal Gun Laws A CrimeThese Names Tend To Land On Santa's Naughty List

77820352_810 Weirdest Requests From Kids To Santa

Get Breaking News First

Receive News, Politics, and Entertainment Headlines Each Morning.
Sign Up

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Police officers could be charged with a crime for enforcing new federal gun control laws in Texas under a proposal by a lawmaker who acknowledges the measure likely would end up in the U.S. Supreme Court.

Rep. Steve Toth, a newly elected Republican from the Woodlands, said his proposal would prevent officers from carrying out any future federal orders to confiscate assault rifles and ammunition magazines.

“There’s a federal law, there’s a 30-round magazine right in front of you – what do I do?” Toth said in an interview. The measure known as the Firearm Protection Act “answers that question in spades,” he said. It moved Tuesday to the House Committee on Federalism.

President Barack Obama has proposed federal laws banning such weapons, but no such laws currently exist.

Toth’s proposal would create a Class A misdemeanor for police officers enforcing any new federal gun regulations. It also would establish cause for the state attorney general to sue anyone who seeks to enforce new federal gun regulations. It is one of several states-rights measures being offered by conservative state lawmakers nationwide in response to federal gun control proposals.

Courts have long upheld the federal government’s right to enact new laws, which generally supersede state law. Asked how legal precedent for the supremacy of federal law would affect enforcement of his bill, Toth said he expects a legal challenge.

“It may end up in the Supreme Court,” he said.

View Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 26,098 other followers