610SPOR2 35h_CBSSportsRad_Houston

News

Mayor Parker Launches Healthy Houston Initiative

Creation of Healthy Houston Task Force to Reduce Obesity
View Comments
A 300-pound 12-year old has been barred from playing peewee football.(Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

A 300-pound 12-year old has been barred from playing peewee football.(Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

Featured Items

77820352_810 Reasons The LLWS Needs To Go Away

Small-WttJJ Watt Talks Contract & Quips "Commercials Only Pay So Much"

77820352_8Meet The 6-10s

136535896 Mayor Parker Launches Healthy Houston InitiativeWATCH: Texans Cheerleaders Take Ice Bucket Challenge

From Our CBS Music Sites

77820352_8Watch: Texans Cheerleaders Spoof Arian Foster

77820352_8Watch: JJ Watt’s NEW Fantasy Football Commercial

77820352_8PHOTOS: Maxim's List Of The 50 Hottest Celebs

Get Breaking News First

Receive News, Politics, and Entertainment Headlines Each Morning.
Sign Up

Mayor Annise Parker today announced the launch of Healthy Houston, an initiative designed to reduce obesity and increase healthy eating and exercise. The initiative will promote programs, policies and actions designed to reduce food deserts, promote the availability of locally-grown foods, encourage the development of sustainable food systems and promote recreational opportunities.

“We know obesity is a significant health threat in our city,” said Mayor Parker. “We want to tackle this issue with innovative ideas and thinking to help Houstonians make smart decisions to lead healthy lifestyles, prevent problems before they occur, lower health care costs and increase productivity and quality of life.”

To lead the initiative, the Mayor has created a Healthy Houston Task Force. They will work to recommend and implement specific actions to reduce the incidence of obesity and its health and economic impacts in the City of Houston, including:

  • Encouraging urban agriculture in community, school, backyard and rooftop gardens and, where feasible, on City property
  • Improving access to healthy, affordable and locally produced food for all neighborhoods
  • Supporting education regarding the physical and mental health risks of obesity and the benefits of sustainable agriculture, using locally produced food, consuming fresh fruits and vegetables, infant breastfeeding, providing healthy meals in our schools, physical activity and exercise, and maintaining a healthy weight
  • Enabling programs that increase physical activity and exercise in schools, at work, and in communities, including those that provide safe playgrounds and parks, pedestrian-friendly walkways, bicycle paths and other recreational opportunities

The following 22 members will serve on the Healthy Houston Task Force:

Dr. Margaret Kripke (Co-Chair)   Chair, Mayor’s Advisory Council on Health and Environment
Dr. Faith Foreman (Co-Chair)    Assistant Director, Houston Dept. of Health & Human Services
Councilmember Stephen Costello, At-Large Position 1
Councilmember Jack Christie, At-Large Position 5
Niiobli Armah, Can Do Houston
Glen Boudreaux, Jackson Walker LLP
Gracie Cavnar, Founder, Recipe for Success Foundation
Eileen Egan,Business Development Director, Near Northwest Management District
Susan Fordice, President, Mental Health America of Greater Houston
Brian Giles, Senior Administrator, Food Services, Houston ISD
J. Barry Hart, Director of Research & Analysis, Fiesta Mart, Inc.
Lynn Henson, Administration Manager, City of Houston Department of Planning & Development
Scott P. Howard, Managing Director, John L. Wortham & Son, L.P.
Auturo Jackson, Senior Director Customer Care & Customized Services, Metropolitan Transit Authority
Mandi Kimball, Public Policy & Government Affairs Director, Children at Risk
Paula McHam, Community Affairs Director, Cigna South Texas/Louisiana
Laura Spanjian, Sustainability Director, Office of the Mayor, City of Houston
Jason McLemore, Executive Director, Greater Southeast Management District
Gerri Walker, Assistant Director of Benefits, City of Houston Human Resources Department
Dr. Shreela Sharma, Assistant Professor, UT School of Public Health Division of Epidemiology, Michael & Susan Dell Center
Toral Sindha, Project Consultant, Healthy Living Matters
Joe Turner, Director, City of Houston Department of Parks & Recreation

In 2010, it was reported that 28% of fourth graders, 17% of adolescents age 15-18 and 29% of adults in Houston/Harris County were obese.  These factors result in a decreased quality of life, increased medical expenses and a shortened life span.

The Houston Area Survey, conducted by Stephen Klineberg and associates at Rice University, demonstrates an increasing concern on the part of the population regarding the availability of affordable food and a high level of interest in the availability of locally-grown food.  Food Trust recently conducted a study showing that Houston, among the fastest growing metropolitan areas in the country, has fewer supermarkets per capita than most of the nation’s large metropolitan areas.

In response, the Healthy Houston Task Force will address food deserts, or a lack of affordable, healthy food in various areas of the city. They will continue existing efforts, including the launch of the City Hall Farmers Market and farmers markets at the City’s multi-service centers; new vegetable container gardens downtown and throughout the City; a Grocery Access Task Force and working with grocers on providing economic tools and incentives to help spur more supermarket and grocery development in areas where they are needed; the launch of Bike Share in Houston and the expansion of bike lanes and trails.

“We want to create, support and implement sustainable policies for Houston to create work, school, and neighborhood environments conducive to healthier eating and increased physical activity among residents,” said Mayor Parker.

The Mayor’s Office, working with the Mayor’s Advisory Council on Health and Environment, partnered with many city departments and organizations to create the Healthy Houston Initiative, including the City of Houston Health and Human Services Department, Planning Department, Parks and Recreation Department, Mayor’s Office of Sustainability, State Senator Rodney Ellis’ office, State Representatives Borris Miles’ and Carol Alvarado’s offices, Councilmember Stephen Costello’s office, HISD, UT School of Public Health, University of Houston, METRO, Harris County Hospital District Foundation, Children at Risk, Can Do Houston, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Recipe for Success, Urban Harvest, Mental Health America of Greater Houston, Houston Area Dietetic Association, American Heart Association, Neighborhood Centers Inc., Fiesta Mart, Inc., Cigna South Texas/Louisiana and Interfaith Ministries for Greater Houston.

View Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 24,843 other followers